Charlotte Russe

A Charlotte Russe. Photo © Jacqui Newling for Sydney Living Museums

Judging by menu cards from the late 1800s, Charlotte Russe was the glamour dessert on fashionable New South Wales’ dining tables. Thanks to the various ‘bake-off’ programs reviving traditional ‘classics’, the Charlotte Russe is certainly a dish worth reviving! Continue reading

Take 5

The plundered punchbowl at Sweetness and Light at Elizabeth Farm. Photograph (c) Scott Hill for Sydney Living Museums

Last Friday at Elizabeth Farm we celebrated the connections between Australia’s oldest European house and India with a night of Bengal sugar – and rum punch! Continue reading

A frozen dinner, 1875 style

Charlotte Russe prepared by Charmaine O'Brien. Photo © Jacqui Newling for Sydney Living Museums

Frozen food is not something we might normally associate with picnics, but in 1875 entrepreneur businessman Thomas Sutcliffe Mort invited three hundred dignitaries to a picnic in Bowenfels, New South Wales, in the Lithgow Valley to demonstrate the colony’s latest technology.
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Easy as pie

A classic butter-pastry Broomfields pie. Photo courtesy Broomfields Pies © Richard Mortimer Photography

Arguably one of our national treasures, the humble pie has been enthusiastically devoured in Australia since 1788. Long before Harry’s Café de Wheels (which started in the 1930s) our colonial forebears bought pies from street vendors, the most famous being the ‘Flying Pieman’,

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Eel festival at Elizabeth Farm

Wrapping an eel in Gymea leaf and paper bark, ready for the barbeque at the Eel Festival at Elizabeth Farm. Photo © James Horan for Sydney Living Museums

Our free, family-friendly Eel Festival celebrates Parramatta’s namesake, the eel, and its significance to the local Darug people the Burramattagal, who for generations have gathered during eel season to feast, trade and share stories.
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When did the chicken cross the divide?

Farm manager Lawrence with his chicken entourage at Rouse Hill House and Farm. (c) Scott Hill, Sydney Living Museums

Farm manager Lawrence with his chicken entourage at Rouse Hill House and Farm. Photo Scott Hill © Sydney Living Museums

Chicken consumption has increased exponentially in Australia since the 1950s, when it was still a select, and for many families, special occasion or luxury food. Thanks to modern production techniques, chicken is now one of our cheapest meats [1].  Not only have chickens reduced in price, the ones we generally buy today have changed in size, form and flavour when compared with the chickens our grandparents were eating. Continue reading

Previously on the menu